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#304821 02/01/2015 02:20 AM
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A recent pickup my first since the Max. A Holler fitted with the Type 3 Holler crossguard. While a common variety I was looking for a special example to fill the slot in my crossguard collection. The dagger has an earlier style scabbard band variation seen with the single reverse screw. The ends of the bands have a Holler enhancement detail of punched acorns. The blade fortunately is real nice exhibiting cross grain running length wise down the center segment and opposite direction on the edges a trait you see on many Holler army blades. For you maker mark guys (John Z) it has the 19 tick very finely detailed Holler mark. What made it special was the Personalization Hptm. Kientz a one looker for me but unfortunately I have not been able to locate Kientz in my rank lists.















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That is a real beauty Tom. The personalization is very well executed and the patina is great! I think this maker mark is quite rare with the very fine lines that form it, I have only seen it a few times.. Congrats! Very pleasing all around! Kevin.


It's ALL in the DETAILS!!.......
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beautiful dagger Tom,congrats

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Tom:

Very, very nice. I have been looking for that mark on a Luft2 for a long time. BTW, not only has it the 19 ticks, but it exhibits slightly different shape to the thermometer as well.

John

Last edited by JohnZ; 02/01/2015 04:17 AM.

Always looking for Eickhorns and etched bayonets.
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Yes, That is very nice, love the engraving, well done. I mentioned this before, but would anyone care to guess why we see so many different styles of engravings. I'm not talking about the chicken scratch ones that were personalized, but even some of those have or made an attempt at a certain resemblance of style? Thanks

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Tom

Stunning dagger in wonderful condition, the personalisation is top notch, a great addition to your collection, it might be your first since the Max but well worth the wait.
Mikee
I've no real idea why we see so many styles of engraving, it could have been down to the jeweller or perhaps there was some kind of master list of engraving types guys could choose from.

Gary

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Yes Gary, engravers used the works of heraldic artists of the day. Their was of course others with famous and fantastic works but one heraldic artist in particular was an engraver who taught many engravers their craft in Germany. I see a lot of his style used on blades of this period. They definitely had a lot to choose from, but the more intricate the more cost involved per letter so I think that's why we see more simplistic styles used.

I don't know but I think we throw the jeweler must've done it around a little bit to much. Sure they did engrave to an extent, but IMO for the very well done superb workmanship we see, the candidates would first be an engraver/shop which were plentiful, then a silver smith or jeweler trained in this skill but more than likely I would say they out sourced them to an engraver/shop or had a skilled engraver in the shop do the work. Their was some rivalry and concerns between engravers and silver smiths of the day. My point being that if you wanted something engraved right and had the money, wouldn't you take it to an engraver? IMO yes.

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After all members who have already written, what can I say.... THIS is a nice HÖLLER! The engraving, and you know I am always very sceptical about any engravings, does look exactly what I do expect in a period done inscription. The patination is to die for. The overall condition could not be better. And the grip (color, structure) is a special addition. Daggers cannot come better!
Concerning the name and the rank lists: My best army, you know my HARTKOPF, did come directly out of the family and I do know the name (and the dagger also is personalized very discreet) but I also could not find the name in any rank list.
Regards,


wotan, gd.c-b#105

"Never look for sqare eggs" as a late owner of an original FHH-dagger used to say.
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Mikee

That's a great explanation, there has always been so many styles, as Wotan mentions its tough to say one way or another on some examples, this one that Tom has is a great example of what we should look for, I've seen a lot over the years I didn't care for.
Is there any reference that you could recommend, I assume a book like "Jasperts Encyclopaedia of Typefaces" would cover most styles we might come across, I'm assuming that engravers would use the old type German fonts as a guide for their work.

Gary

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Thanks guys appreciate the feedback! It is amazing as stated the different styles & types of engravings certainly their was a slew of professional engravers during the period not to mention the examples done by amateurs. Of note seems the early Weyersberg examples have similar style engravings perhaps they had an in house guy or a preferred engraver. Also it seems in most cases they had to engrave then plate? So would this mean they would send the crossguard out for engraving then plate and assemble per special order? I also know some of these were certainly done on a plated guard as you can see the different base metal in the engraving. John I thought of you when I saw the maker mark I know you have mentioned needing this mark. Based on the period of this dagger I certainly believe a 2nd luft exists with this mark.


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really beautiful dagger and the great photos enhance its beauty


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